Theorize Art, Ideas and Culture. The Idea Becomes a Machine that Makes the Art. -Sol LeWitt #concept #ChaseAlias #art #theory #FineArt #newmedia #conceptualart #artblog #theorizeart #artfair #museum #photography #painting #sculpture

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Saturday, November 16, 2013

Mike Shine: Ad Age on Theorize Art




After 25 Years as Adman, Mike Shine Transitions to Full-Time Artist

BSSP Creative and Co-Founder Departs Agency to Focus on His Passion

These days, when an agency creative leaves her or his post, it's usually to: defect to another agency, hang a new shingle, head to the marketer side or explore Silicon Valley.
Mike Shine
For a crew that's so creative, it's rare that they leave just to go do more of what is it they do best. Stretch those creative muscles.
But that's exactly what Mike Shine will be doing as he departs California agency Butler, Shine, Stern & Partners to focus on his artwork -- which draws on a broad range of inspirations and ranges from graffiti to large installations.
Mike Shine
He pays homage to early surf and skate culture by painting on driftwood he finds while catching waves. But he's also fascinated by the creepiness of American carnival culture and the dark side of Nordic mythology, having created interactive experiences inspired by both.
It's a far cry from his career as an adman. Mr. Shine and John Butler, partners for 25 years, were the first creative duo to exit Goodby Silverstein & Partners in San Francisco to start their own agency.
They opened it in 1993 and soon after Greg Stern joined the shop as its CEO. The Sausalito-based firm has stayed independent since then (and has no plans on selling anytime in the near future), working with clients such as Mini Cooper, Google, Priceline, Columbia Sportswear, Coca-Cola's Zico and a recent addition,U.S. Bank. In a note to employees, Mr. Butler talks about his friend and partner and explains that it's high time for him to get more recognition for his artwork. Read it below.
Mike Shine
And to check out more of Mr. Shine's work, head here.
Mike Shine has always been an artist.
He's been my partner for over 25 years, and he's always carried himself that way. Back when we were a young team at Chiat/Day in New York, when he wasn't writing and art directing ads with me, he was building furniture on the roof of his building in Manhattan. His apartment at the time looked like the love child of George Jetson and Alvar Aalto, and every bit of it was constructed on that roof, by hand.
If we were working on a print campaign, many times, Mike did the illustrations, or rendered the type by hand. I was usually the more patient one (that will blow a few minds I'm sure) so would wind up spending hours cutting it apart and designing the pieces, but much of it visually started with Mike. He was always a talented illustrator, with a solid aesthetic, and when it came to defining a look, nobody did it better.
As we moved west, to Goodby, Berlin & Silverstein, where we were fortunate enough to meet Stern, Mike kept making things in his spare time. It seemed like it didn't really matter what it was, in the end, the point was that it was something he did on his own, without a partner or a client or a budget telling him how it should be. Shortly after starting the company, in his spare time he renovated homes and built everything that went into them, from floor to ceiling, like a modern day Frank Lloyd Wright. And then he started putting things on the walls, which seemed to me like the final transformation.
In the midst of all of this, he helped to create a great agency. A place that is fun and creative, yet maddening and frustrating at times, as well. An agency that people leave (sadly, just about everyone leaves at some point,) yet one that no one ever fully leaves, as evidenced by the many who have come back to us for a second and third stint, and that speaks volumes.
And now, as Mike has told you, it's his time to leave. His exposure as an artist has reached a level that will take him out of here more and more frequently, so it seemed like the timing was right to make the jump. He goes with love and support from both Greg and me—he'll be missed, but he'll be doing what he loves to do—making stuff. He continues to be one of the most talented people I have ever worked with— he'll always be a founding partner to me, and this place wouldn't ever have come into existence without him.
I wanted you all to know that this is something that we've talked about for a while, and planned for. The three of us have never bought into the whole cult of personality thing—this place is and continues to be as good as the people who are here. And to that point, we've spent a good bit of time these past 5 years cultivating and training a crew of very talented CDs and ACDs who will continue to do what they do, creating exceptional brand stories for our clients, on a day to day basis.
I imagine you'll see Mike here from time to time. Hopefully we can snare him to help us with a pitch or something along the way. Because as I said earlier, you never really leave this place.
Thanks, John

#TheorizeArt #MikeShine #ChaseAlias

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

Barbara Kruger on Theorize Art





Untitled 1982























Theorize Art Gives Thanks to Our Source
http://www.eng.fju.edu.tw/Literary_Criticism/feminism/kruger/kruger.htm 




    The juxtaposition of word and image in Barbara Kruger's highly recognizable work is derived from twelve years as a designer and photo editor for Conde Nast publications.  Short, pithy caption-like copy is scattered over fragmented and enlarged photographs appropriated from various media.  Usually declarative or accusatory in tone, these phrases posit an opposition between the pronouns "you" and "we," which satirically refer to "men" and "women."  These humorous works suspend the viewer between the fascination of the image and the indictment of the text while reminding us that language and its use within culture to construct and maintina proverbs, jobs, jokes, myths, and history reinforce the interests and perspective of those who control it ((Day 69).  (--Cf. John Berger's Ways of Seeing Chap 3.; Craig Owen, "The Discourse of Others," The Anti-Aesthetic.  Ed. Hal Foster.  pp. 65-90. (the works without page number are post-card reproductions). 


1. critique/challenge of objectification of women
Untitled, 1981 
Photograph by Barbara Kruger 
Untitled 1981
Untitled 1988  51.5 x 68.5 (Day 66)
 
Untitled 1982
Untitled 1981
Untitled 1982
  
II. Critique/challenge of male power (supported by patriarchal discourses) 
 
Untitled 1981
Right: Untitled 1983  118.5x76.5 (Day 64)
 
Untitled 1981
 
Left: Untitled 1982
Untitled 1982
Untitled 1983
Untitled 1981 
Untitled 1986
Untitled 1980/  40.75 x 50.75 (Day 66)
Right: Untitled 1990  99 x 40.5 (Day 65)

The Idea Machines: Brian Russell‏@TheUnderfoldDear #creatives......

The Idea Machines:
Brian Russell‏@TheUnderfold



Saturday, November 16, 2013



Brian Russell@TheUnderfold

Dear ...
Spread the word, friends. We’re all in this together.

Dear #creatives......: Brian Russell ‏ @ TheUnderfold Dear # creatives ... Spread the word, friends. We’re all in this together. # art # makeart ...

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

.

. by Gabriele Cappello
., a photo by Gabriele Cappello on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Elisa


film.


Portfolio | Facebook | MM | Tumblr | Twitter

City Lights {Explored}

City Lights {Explored} by Matt.J.Harris.
City Lights {Explored}, a photo by Matt.J.Harris. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Thanks to MariaAmanda~ Model/Stock
mariaamanda.deviantart.com

ঢাকের তালে (On the Beats of The Drums) [Explored]

Via Flickr:
Two musicians of CHHAU DANCE group performing at Purulia District, West Bengal.

From a very early age, Chhau Dance is occupying a significant position in the Dance tradition of Bengal and today it is seen as one of the most popular artistic excellence of Bengal.

♥ by kiciarandagia
, a photo by kiciarandagia on Flickr.

one hundred and forty eight /365

Via Flickr:
may 28, 2013

I took in the Vivian Maier exhibition in Chicago when I was there last week. To say she is a photography hero would be a bit of an understatement. It was pretty wild to stand in front of her photos instead of looking at them on a screen, and I think I stood in one spot for far too long, far too often, in quiet reverence.

The exhibit was a lot smaller than I'd hoped, but it made up for it by featuring complete rolls of developed film plastered around the perimeter of the room. That was ridiculously cool - to see frame by frame how she approached a subject until she got the shot she wanted. Not something we see with digital (except for our own), and very interesting to get inside her process a bit.

Steven saw an exhibition of her work previously and he described it along the lines of "simultaneously totally inspiring and made me want to give up all at once"... Yeah. That sounds about right.

Ah-maz-ing.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Limited express "Rapit".

The Idea Machine

The Idea Machine by Chase Alias :)(:
The Idea Machine, a photo by Chase Alias :)(: on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The Idea Machine from Endogenous Series, 2010-2012

The Medium is not the Message, the idea brcomes the machine that makes the art. #chasealias
#immersionism
#endogenous

David S Pollack aka Chase Alias hopes to bring to light with his new Endogenous Series how backwards moving our cultural standards have become. As an Immersionist he look back in envy at the freedoms which artists used to be able to express themselves without having to worry about cultural and even legal action being taken against them.

Immersionism is a young art movement which combines Lewittian Conceptualism with Method Acting practices and principles. Stanislavsky and Strasberg Acting Methods which utilize sense memory and affective memory are an Immersionist's base. Lewittian Conceptualism adheres to the ideal that the medium is not the message, the idea becomes a machine that makes the art.

HDR Video Still form an HD Video Screen Capture, Originally Filmed with an HD Flip Camera

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Thomas Ruff Nudes


Thomas Ruff Nudes with StockingsThomas Ruff bu04, 2001 Nude with Stockings
Thomas Ruff created his Innovative Nude Photograph Series (NUD) by downloading images from the Internet and Magazines and then digitally manipulating each Nude Photograph so the Nude Photograph is blurred.
By blurring the graphic image, Thomas Ruff changes the content and emotional reaction to the sexual image of the Nude Photograph.
Thomas Ruff Nude on Couch tos03
Thomas Ruff
tos03, 2001, Nude on Couch
Thomas RuffNude with Stockings NUD 041 (From the Nudes Series), 2001
Thomas Ruff
ez14, 2001 Lips
Thomas Ruff Nude Couple em08 (From the Nudes Series), 2001Thomas Ruff
em08, 2001, Nude Couple
Thomas RuffNude with Stockings NUD 041 (From the Nudes Series), 2001Thomas Ruff
ree07, 2001 Red Panties
Thomas Ruff Nude with Stockings bu04  (From the Nudes Series), 2001
Thomas Ruff
bu04, 2001 Nude with Stockings
Thomas Ruff Two Male Nudes NUD 022 (From the Nudes Series), 2001
Thomas Ruff
an04, 2001 Two Male Nudes


A State of Insecurity

Via Flickr:
A State of Insecurity from Endogenous Series, 2010 - 2012

Our considerations tend to stop at a certain level, on a level that provides a sense of security. How many people willingly locate themselves in a state of insecurity? -Ai WeiWei

Chase Alias attempts to get into the mind state of Conceptual Artists Ai Weiwei particularly embracing some of his ideals and philosophies. This work is particularly inspired by the activist artist's struggles and triumphs throughout the year.

David S Pollack aka Chase Alias hopes to bring to light with his new Endogenous Series how backwards moving our cultural standards have become. As an Immersionist he look back in envy at the freedoms which artists used to be able to express themselves without having to worry about cultural and even legal action being taken against them.

Immersionism is a young art movement which combines Lewittian Conceptualism with Method Acting practices and principles. Stanislavsky and Strasberg Acting Methods which utilize sense memory and affective memory are an Immersionist's base. Lewittian Conceptualism adheres to the ideal that the medium is not the message, the idea becomes a machine that makes the art.

#aiweiwei #chasealias #immersionism

Ai Weiwei. Ai Weiwei's Blog: Writings, Interviews, and Digital Rants, 2006-2009 (Writing Art)

Obliquity

Obliquity by Chase Alias :)(:
Obliquity, a photo by Chase Alias :)(: on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Obliquity from Endogenous Series, 2010 - 2012

All that we do is done with an eye toward something else.
-Aristotle

Imagine if artists had the nerve to make interesting public art anymore. We would all be a little richer. So often artists choose very commercial routes to exhibit and possible sell their works never realizing how much potential exposure and brand recognition is missed by ignoring public art. Very few artist have been bold enough to place their show freely. Banksy in London has made his city so proud his gorilla marketing style is a symbiotic approach to the art experience.

The original gorilla style art however was used and perfected by one of the original Gorilla Girls, Barbara Kruger. Her use of Russian reconstrutivust type faces mixed with Marshall McLuhan inspire phrase layer over her ver raw images gave the viewer A very guttural response. The greatest tool in her arsenal was her smart use of NYC's billboards to exhibit hers works publicy.

As a young Immersionist I have made sure to create a cannon of works that are as publicly visible as possible. Every image is CC and has great online exposure.

Edogenous Series 2010 - 2012 lends itself to a very large format. With grainy degenerative quaities and the use of heat quotes by fascinating people thes images would works very well on billboards in NYC and other metropolitan areas

The art of it is that the works will advertise nothing but impact their environments greatly all while employe the juxtaposition of using a traditional advertising medium. This might seem like a lift goal. But with public help, public art can be interesting again.

I'm raising money for Interesting Public Art Using Billboards. Click to Donate: www.gofundme.com/343204 #gofundme

#chasealias #immersionism #endogenous

Impossible to Understand

Via Flickr:
Impossible to Understand from Endogenous Series, 2010-2012

Any significance would be impossible to understand. When you do understand, it would be indescribable. Everything is different when there is no meaning. - Ai Weiwei

market.android.com/details?id=album-Bcbnoebhicggs2mrrem2s....

Impossible to Understand from Endogenous Series, 2010-2012

rhizome.org/portfolios/artwork/53961//

Chase Alias gets into the mind state of conceptual artists Ai Weiwei particularly embracing his ideals and philosophies about how he feels nudity is not pornography. Perhaps Chase is taking its to a slightly elevated level though. What is he saying about pornography? Certainly nothing more graphic or shocking than his Conceptual Art Photography forefathers did such as Mapplethorpe, Serrano or even Thomas Ruff.

David S Pollack aka Chase Alias hopes to bring to light with his new Endogenous Series how backwards moving our cultural standards have become. As an Immersionist he look back in envy at the freedoms which artists used to be able to express themselves without having to worry about cultural and even legal action being taken against them.

Immersionism is a young art movement which combines Lewittian Conceptualism with Method Acting practices and principles. Stanislavsky and Strasberg Acting Methods which utilize sense memory and affective memory are an Immersionist's base. Lewittian Conceptualism adheres to the ideal that the medium is not the message, the idea becomes a machine that makes the art.

Ai Weiwei. Ai Weiwei's Blog: Writings, Interviews, and Digital Rants, 2006-2009 (Writing Art) (Kindle Locations 1052-1053). Kindle Edition.

HDR Video Screen Capture as played on Adobe Quicktime. Originally capture on a Flip Video
HD.
#chasealias #aiweiwei #immersionism #endogenous

Saturday, June 1, 2013


Prominent Pavilions At The Venice Biennale

VENICE, Italy (AP) — The 55th Venice Biennale, the world's most prestigious art fair, features national pavilions from 88 countries, 10 presenting work for the first time — including the Vatican. No official theme ties together the pavilions, but several ideas are emerging as favorites, including greed, collective actions and the boundaries of the physical world. Top prizes at the biennale, which runs through Nov. 24, are being announced on Saturday.
Here are some of the prominent pavilions in this year's edition.
UNITED STATES
Step back and Sarah Sze's "Triple Point" series of installations at the U.S. Pavilion is a vision of symmetry and scale, ambition and grandeur. Move in and there's another way to see it, through countless tiny and more intimate scenes, much like a painting by the Dutch master Pieter Bruegel.
Sze has gathered myriad objects — it's no exaggeration to say from around the world — to create her Biennale commission, and she spent 2 1/2 months composing it on site, slogging through Venice's rainiest winter in more than a century.
Her sculptures are collections of everyday objects, from fans to screwdrivers to packs of sugar, connected by sticks and twigs and suspended by string and yarn, to suggest a larger system — a planetarium, observatory or pendulum.
"In each of the rooms, I was really thinking about how we model that amount of information," Sze said. "How do we make sense of it? The idea for each of the sculptures is based around a system of modeling information that is often beyond our ability to understand, like the cosmos or the weather."
BRITAIN
There is little subtle about Jeremy Deller, neither the fluorescent pink pants he wore to previews nor his Biennale art for the British Council — work that takes bold aim at the whims of the rich and the powerful.
The central piece is a painting of an oversized bird of prey called the hen harrier that has a Range Rover in its talons. The work references the 2007 shooting of a pair of hen harriers on the Sandringham Estate on a day when Prince Harry and a friend went shooting. As for the Range Rover, it is the object of the bird's revenge, and Deller's swipe at the haughty who ride them, particularly on London roads where he cycles.
"It's an opportunity to get something off your chest," Deller said this week. "You know you are going to have an audience."
In the next room, a painting depicts the late Victorian designer and socialist William Morris, who appears as a giant throwing Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich's 377-foot yacht into the Venetian lagoon. It's Deller's jab at Abramavoich for mooring the vessel on Venice's Giardini quay, blocking the view.
VATICAN
Australian artist Lawrence Carroll was one of three artists invited to create work for the Vatican's debut pavilion. While being tapped was an honor, he said, it's all a far cry from the Vatican commissions given to masters such as Raphael and Michelangelo.
"Commission is a funny word. Commission implies they are buying the paintings, and that is not the case. I am not sure what will happen to them after," Carroll said. "This wasn't commissioned for the Sistine Chapel. This is temporary."
Carroll's work concludes the trilogy of themes decided by the Vatican: Creation, Un-Creation and Re-Creation. The artist, who until recently lived in Venice, said he could connect with the theme, as much of his work has dealt with giving new life to objects — a passion that goes back to his childhood when his thrifty immigrant parents would find ways to extend the use of everyday things.
Four paintings hang in one room — all large monochromatic canvases in white. One he calls "generically a sleeping painting"; it has a square space cut in the canvas where a folded canvas has been stashed, like a blanket, to be brought out at some point when needed. Another painting is embedded in a block of ice, which melts and refreezes cyclically, a process that continually modifies it.
RUSSIA
For Russian artist Vadim Zakharov, only women can save the world from corruption.
Zakharov's installation embraces the entire pavilion and is itself a metaphor for the Greek myth of Danae, who was locked in a room by her father the king, yet impregnated by Zeus in the form of a shower of gold.
The main floor is man's domain, where greed and corruption rule and where the masses can be dismissed as "peanuts," a notion the artist conveys with irony and humor through a man dressed in a business suit who sits on cowboy saddle shucking peanuts and casting the shells into a pile.
On the lower flower, Zakharov created a cave as a refuge for women only and which communicate with the level above through two holes Zakharov cut in the floor. Through one, gold coins are showered down. Through another, a man in a business suit hauls them up in a bucket and dumps them into a conveyor belt to feed the shower.
In the cave, women visitors carry umbrellas as protection against the showers of gold coins, and are asked to deposit some back into the bucket.
"It's about how you can corrupt with money," said Berlin curator Udo Kittelmann. "The hope for the future is women."
ISRAEL
Israeli Gilad Ratman's multimedia installation follows the fictional journey of a group of people who tunnel from Israel to Venice — creating a hole in the floor as they dig their way in.
A video shows them departing from a hillside, digging the tunnel and arriving at the pavilion, where they set to work sculpting busts from clay they have brought from Israel.
"The journey is about nothing. It's to create a narrative that does not have any purpose or causality. It's the process of creating a work of art," said Sergio Edelsztein who curated the pavilion.
The pavilion reverberates with a guttural sound, a recording of all the sculpting, crawling and walking that have taken place along the journey.
JAPAN
Communal action is central to Koki Tanaka's work in the Japan Pavilion, titled "Abstract Speaking: Sharing Uncertainty and Collective Acts."
Tanaka's thinking about collective action crystalized following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, which he followed from Los Angeles where he lives.
"When the earthquake happened, people collaborated and helped each other to deal with the strange situation," Tanaka said.
On Twitter, Tanaka followed as friends in Tokyo chronicled their hours-long walks home without public transport. People responded spontaneously, opening up their homes and businesses as temporary shelters. Tanaka said even his own gallery took people in.
Already before the quake, Tanaka had done a few video pieces as part of earlier work that also dealt with the outcomes of collective acts, such a group of hairdressers collaborating on the same hair cut or artists making pottery together.
"We realized this kind of video could be reinterpreted in the post-earthquake society," said curator Mika Kuraya.
FRANCE and GERMANY
It may be the spirit of Franco-German friendship, which has been at the core of postwar Europe. Or it may just be a collection of artists open to new venues after years of shunned proposals.
But France and Germany, whose pavilions stand opposite each other in the Giardini, took the unusual steps of pavilion-swapping this edition.
In the German Pavilion, French-Albanian artist Anri Sala produces a multimedia installation of musical recordings and videos of a piano concerto composed by French composer Maurice Ravel for the left hand. The show is called "Ravel Ravel Unravel," a play on the English verb "to rave" and the composer's name.
For Germany, exchanging pavilions wasn't enough. It invited artists from four countries to underline the international nature of artistic inspiration, inherently questioning national schemes. The artists include Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, who contributed a sculpture of 886 antique stools that are arranged in interlocking arches. He was unable to attend the biennale, where he also has two other installations, because Chinese authorities denied him a visa.

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