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Monday, January 23, 2012

Alida Brandenburg and Rob Michael on [RIAA Accounting: Why The Only Ship Pirating is Really Sinking is That of the Record Labels.] | Theorize Art


Rob Michael's profile photo
Rob Michael  -  3:19 PM  -  Public
The ludicrous term we know as "Content Piracy" is such a misnomer. Can we come up with a new name?

How about Content Curator?

I don't know of one single artist who has ever been harmed in any way by content sharing.

Content Sharing is a service to us all. Branding it 'Piracy" is a disservice.
Alida Brandenburg's profile photoAlida Brandenburg originally shared this post:
[RIAA Accounting: Why The Only Ship Pirating is Really Sinking is That of the Record Labels.]

Because let's not forget who really makes most of the money off of those record sales: the record labels. It's not the artist.

Here is an important article outlining just how the economics of this work, and why it's actually the labels who are hurting most from pirated music. Most musicians make the majority of their money through tours, merchandise, and/or sponsorships.

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20100712/23482610186.shtml

Seriously, read this article.

"Going back ten years ago, Courtney Love famously laid out the details of recording economics, where the label can make $11 million... and the actual artists make absolutely nothing. It starts off with a band getting a massive $1 million advance, and then you follow the money:..."

[Click above link for fascinating, detailed breakdown.]

"...And that explains why huge megastars like Lyle Lovett have pointed out that he sold 4.6 million records and never made a dime from album sales. It's why the band 30 Seconds to Mars went platinum and sold 2 million records and never made a dime from album sales. You hear these stories quite often."

And here is another article that outlines why, on the contrary, giving away free music actually works as a successful business model. As a musician, the music itself isn't necessarily the product you have to sell. It's the experience. It's the exclusivity. It's the community you build around your brand. Put another way, the music may be the meat of your stew, but you need only charge for the bowl and spoon. Sure, you could eat with your hands, but why do that when you can pay get extra tools to enhance your experience?

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20091119/1634117011.shtml

Again, seriously, read this article.

"Where the experiment got even more interesting was that he offered up the $300 Ultra-Deluxe Limited Edition Package -- of which there was a limit of just 2,500 available. This was an even more impressive 'box' that also included the songs on high quality vinyl, and some beautiful giclée print images. But, most interesting of all was that that limited set of 2,500 were all signed by Reznor himself.

"It took just 30 hours for all 2,500 to sell out, bringing in $750,000 in just over a day.

For music he was giving away for free. "

We're living in one of the most interesting eras of our time in which everything is shifting rapidly. The entertainment industry in particular is going through a period of awkward growing pains, the result of which can either be a stubborn determination to dig in the proverbial heels and stay with an antiquated model, or the birth of innovation and more equitable distribution of wealth and benefit. It's going to be a viscous, ugly battle to end, but as they say, it ain't over 'til the fat lady sings. But the question remains: who will be the one paid for that performance?

#PIPA #SOPA #lol #humor
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